Rail enthusiasts around the world mark #NationalTrainDay

The Festival Flyer crosses the Forth Bridge at North Queensferry in August 1992. Picture: Ian Rutherford/TSPL
The Festival Flyer crosses the Forth Bridge at North Queensferry in August 1992. Picture: Ian Rutherford/TSPL
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Rail enthusiasts around the world have been marking National Train Day.

The event was started by Amtrak, the American rail operator, in 2008 as a promotional campaign to encourage the public to travel by train and learn more about the network’s history.

Murrayburn School pupils board a British Rail TV train bound for St Andrews at Gorgie East station in Edinburgh in 1962. The train, equipped with closed-circuit television, allowed the children to be taught as they travelled along. Gorgie East closed to passenger services in the same year. Picture: TSPL

Murrayburn School pupils board a British Rail TV train bound for St Andrews at Gorgie East station in Edinburgh in 1962. The train, equipped with closed-circuit television, allowed the children to be taught as they travelled along. Gorgie East closed to passenger services in the same year. Picture: TSPL

It has since been adopted by enthusiasts around the world, particularly on social media, as a day to mark railway heritage.

To mark the 2017 National Train Day, The Scotsman has shared several pictures from its extensive photographic archive of trains working across Scotland, from steam train excursions to famous express services.

Earlier this year, The Scotsman marked the 175th anniversary of the opening of Scotland’s busiest passenger railway.

The Edinburgh - Glasgow mainline via Falkirk High opened to regular traffic on February 21, 1842.

A former LNER steam train (engine no 419) passes Longniddry on its way to Shildon, County Durham in August 1975. Picture: Ian Brand/TSPL

A former LNER steam train (engine no 419) passes Longniddry on its way to Shildon, County Durham in August 1975. Picture: Ian Brand/TSPL

The route is a pillar of the Scottish economy and used by thousands of commuters on a daily basis.

A typical weekday on the railway sees 62 services travelling along the 47 mile stretch between Glasgow and Edinburgh. In 2016, more than seven million passenger journeys were made.

Construction took almost four years and was no easy task. To ensure an almost perfectly level route, numerous cuttings were dug, four substantial viaducts were built and three tunnels were driven through hills and solid rock.

Such was the huge level interest in the project, members of the public were invited to walk through the completed Queen Street tunnel on New Year’s Day 1842. A ceremonial opening ceremony was held on February 19 and the line opened for business two days later.

A passenger service at Joppa station, Edinburgh, in 1964, shortly before the station was closed as part of the Beeching cuts. Picture: TSPL

A passenger service at Joppa station, Edinburgh, in 1964, shortly before the station was closed as part of the Beeching cuts. Picture: TSPL

The railway put an end to the slow and cumbersome stagecoach services that had linked Glasgow and Edinburgh for more than a century, and would soon drive business away from the established canal network.

An Argyll & Sutherland Highlander engine pulls the Flying Scotsman out of Waverley Station on its way to London in April 1966. Picture: TSPL

An Argyll & Sutherland Highlander engine pulls the Flying Scotsman out of Waverley Station on its way to London in April 1966. Picture: TSPL

The George Stephenson pulls a West Highland excursion service between Bridge Of Orchy and Tyndrum in 1997. Picture: Denis Straughan/TSPL

The George Stephenson pulls a West Highland excursion service between Bridge Of Orchy and Tyndrum in 1997. Picture: Denis Straughan/TSPL

Trainspotters welcome the Flying Scotsman at Waverley Station in Edinburgh, April 1966. Picture: Alan Ledgerwood/TSPL

Trainspotters welcome the Flying Scotsman at Waverley Station in Edinburgh, April 1966. Picture: Alan Ledgerwood/TSPL

The Royal Scotsman service crosses the Forth Bridge in 2003. Picture: Jon Savage/TSPL

The Royal Scotsman service crosses the Forth Bridge in 2003. Picture: Jon Savage/TSPL

An NCB-owned steam locomotive working at Polkemmet colliery in West Lothian, May 1974. The mine closed as a result of flooding during the 1984-5 miners' strike. Picture: Denis Straughan/TSPL

An NCB-owned steam locomotive working at Polkemmet colliery in West Lothian, May 1974. The mine closed as a result of flooding during the 1984-5 miners' strike. Picture: Denis Straughan/TSPL