Pictorial history celebrates 50 years of Glasgow Airport

Spectators on the terminal's viewing platform in 1967
Spectators on the terminal's viewing platform in 1967
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A pictorial history of Scotland's first major airport has been published to mark its 50th birthday,

The 98-page souvenir, 50 Years of Glasgow Airport, was compiled by Dugald Cameron and has been circulated among staff.

Original Glasgow Airport logo

Original Glasgow Airport logo

The site at Abbotsinch took over from Renfrew Airport in 1966, and hosted its first commercial flight on 2 May 1966 - a British European Airways (BEA) service from Edinburgh.

The day before, a Loganair Cherokee-6 was the first to land, with the aircraft returning to Glasgow on 28 April 2016 to mark the 50th anniversary.

Construction of the terminal, designed by Sir Basil Spence, and other work, took a year and cost £4.5 million.

The architect said the design "helped the traveller to feel the adventure of flying".

The original terminal building shortly after the airport opened in 1966

The original terminal building shortly after the airport opened in 1966

An airstrip had opened at Abbotsinch, west of Glasgow, in 1932 and became home of RAF 602 Squadron (City of Glasgow).

It became a naval air base in 1943 and was renamed HMS Sanderling, later becoming RNAS Abbotsinch until its closure in 1963.

The Queen opened Glasgow Airport on 27 June 1966.

Glasgow Corporation - the city council's predecessor - was initially unwilling to run the airport, fearing it would be a financial burden on ratepayers.

The flights departure board inside the terminal

The flights departure board inside the terminal

However, it unexpectedly made a profit of nearly £18,000 in 1967 rather than a projected £100,000 loss.

The airport's original seven airlines have grown to 30.

Those which have operated since the start include Aer Lingus, British Airways (then as BEA), Icelandair and Loganair.

The annual passenger total has increased from 1.5 million to 9m, on more than 120 routes.

Passengers dining in the terminal restaurant

Passengers dining in the terminal restaurant

Transatlantic flights started in 1967 and BA launched its "London Shuttle" to Heathrow in 1975.

The terminal was extended in 1976 and 1989, the latter making it 70 per cent bigger.

T2, a second check-in hall, was opened in 2004.

Airport managing director Amanda McMillan, writing in the book, said: "I take an immense sense of pride from the 5,000 people who work tirelessly to ensure the continued success of Glasgow.

"They are the life and soul of the airport and I would like to dedicate this book to them and all those who have played a part in our success over the past 50 years."

These pictures are from the photography collections of Alastair Campbell, Dave Lacey, Dugald Cameron, Fred Seggie, Glasgow Airport, Gordon Macadie, Hugh Brown GAAEC, Jim Fulton, John Exton, John Martingale, Keith Mccluskey, Mark Piacentini, Scottish Passenger Agents Association, Stewart Davidson, Tudor Lewis, Walter Bell and Wilf White.

Exterior of the terminal building in 1966. The frontage is now the back of the check-in hall

Exterior of the terminal building in 1966. The frontage is now the back of the check-in hall

A British Eagle BAC 1-11 on Glasgow Airport's opening day - 2 May 1966. The airline was the first to operate jet aircraft between the airport and Heathrow

A British Eagle BAC 1-11 on Glasgow Airport's opening day - 2 May 1966. The airline was the first to operate jet aircraft between the airport and Heathrow

Interior of the terminal in the 1960s

Interior of the terminal in the 1960s

The Queen officially opens the airport by unveiling a plaque on 27 June 1966

The Queen officially opens the airport by unveiling a plaque on 27 June 1966

A 1954 picture of Renfrew Airport, which Glasgow replaced

A 1954 picture of Renfrew Airport, which Glasgow replaced

A photocall beside an Icelandair Boeing 727 in the 1980s. Scotland is Iceland's oldest international air link, launched with a flying boat service to Largs Bay in 1945

A photocall beside an Icelandair Boeing 727 in the 1980s. Scotland is Iceland's oldest international air link, launched with a flying boat service to Largs Bay in 1945