Harris Tweed orb becomes coat of arms as photo exhibit set to open

The Harris Tweed Authority has received the ultimate seal of approval from Lord Lyon, King of Arms, who has bestowed upon the business a Grant of Arms. Picture: Greg Macvean
The Harris Tweed Authority has received the ultimate seal of approval from Lord Lyon, King of Arms, who has bestowed upon the business a Grant of Arms. Picture: Greg Macvean
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HARRIS TWEED’S orb trademark has been officially recognised as a coat of arms.

The “historic milestone” for the brand is seen as a further acknowledgement of Harris Tweed’s unique status, and will bolster its protection from imitations.

The Harris Tweed Authority has received the ultimate seal of approval from Lord Lyon, King of Arms, who has bestowed upon the business a Grant of Arms. Picture: Greg Macvean

The Harris Tweed Authority has received the ultimate seal of approval from Lord Lyon, King of Arms, who has bestowed upon the business a Grant of Arms. Picture: Greg Macvean

The iconic orb has been the symbol of Harris Tweed since the early 20th century and was established to indicate the authenticity and quality of the cloth produced.

The Lord Lyon, King of Arms, has approved the use of the orb as a coat of arms ahead of a photo exhibition on Saturday that celebrates the heritage brand and the community of weavers behind it.

A decade in the making, Ian Lawson’s exhibition will form part of Scotland’s year-long celebration of innovation, architecture and design.

The exhibition will open in Rheged Cebntre, Penrith in Cumbria and will then travel to An Lanntair Arts Centre in Stornoway, which will showcase the exhibit from July 1 until August 16.

Harris Tweed supports around 380 jobs in the Outer Hebrides

Harris Tweed supports around 380 jobs in the Outer Hebrides

READ MORE: Soaring demand sees Harris Tweed investment

The Harris Tweed Act 1993 defines the cloth as a product “handwoven by the islanders at their homes in the Outer Hebrides, finished in the Outer Hebrides, and made from pure virgin wool dyed and spun in the Outer Hebrides.”

Norman Macdonald, chairman of the Harris Tweed Authority, said: “Being awarded a Grant of Arms is a historic milestone for Harris Tweed which has fought for decades to protect the sanctuary of the Harris Tweed cloth.

“It’s the ultimate protection for our products which are known for throughout the world for consistently high standards of quality and authenticity.

Models wear Harris Tweed clothing. Picture: Robert Perry

Models wear Harris Tweed clothing. Picture: Robert Perry

“It’s an honour to receive the Grant of Arms from Lord Lyon himself and we are grateful to be able to ensure the security of our cloth and its heritage for generations to come.”

READ MORE: Harris Tweed leads Scotland’s first architecture and design celebration

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