Comic tells forgotten William Wallace story

A scene from the forthcoming comic book on Sir William Wallace

A scene from the forthcoming comic book on Sir William Wallace

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A NEW Scottish comic will tell the forgotten story of Sir William Wallace and his right-hand man Andrew de Moray at the Battle of Stirling Bridge.

Wallace’s role in the legendary battle is well known, thanks in part to the Hollywood blockbuster Braveheart.

A scene from the comic book on Robert the Bruce. A similar book on Sir William Wallace will be published next year

A scene from the comic book on Robert the Bruce. A similar book on Sir William Wallace will be published next year

But Colin Maxwell, who is a media lecturer at Fife College in Dunfermline, hopes his new comic will bring the story of Moray, who died following the fight, to a wider audience.

The release comes after a comic by Maxwell, telling the story of King Robert the Bruce, sold out its initial print run after teachers snapped up the few remaining copies.

“The book is not just about Wallace, it also tells the story of Andrew Moray - the other Scottish commander who is often forgotten about. He was injured at Stirling Bridge and died shortly after,” he said.

“Moray and Wallace combined their armies and the rest is history. The book finishes with Edward I plotting his revenge.”

It’s an enjoyable way to teach history, especially to a younger audience

Colin Maxwell

Maxwell described his motivation to publish the comics as historical rather than political.

“When we started the Bruce book, it was around the time of the referendum campaign but it was never motivated by that,” he said. “It tied in with the Bannockburn anniversary, and the local links between Bruce and Dunfermline.”

Maxwell is now considering potential topics for his third book.

“We might finish the Bruce story, or Wallace,” he said. “I’m open to ideas or working with other artists.”

Artwork from Colin Maxwell's new comic

Artwork from Colin Maxwell's new comic

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Maxwell wrote King Robert the Bruce & the Wars of Independence while student Michael Philp produced the artwork.

The 28-page book tells the story of Bruce’s seizure of the Scots crown and finishes with the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 which secured his position.

Bruce is buried at Dunfermline Abbey and an annual festival celebrating his life takes place at the town’s Pittencrief Park.

Front page of the comic.

Front page of the comic.

“I thought it would be nice to produce something that celebrates the local link between Bruce and Dunfermline,” said Maxwell.

“Some of my students were working on small animations involving Bruce and the spider. I noticed Michael’s talent as an artist and I suggested we produce a book together.”

The comic was finished in 2014 and went on sale ahead of the 700th anniversary of Bannockburn. The self-published title proved a hit and has since sold out its 500 print run.

“It’s an enjoyable way to teach history, especially to a younger audience,” said Maxwell.

“A lot of local schools have bought copies of the Bruce comic. The Wars of Independence is already on the curriculum at National and Higher levels.”

Wallace and Moray: Guardians of Scotland, will be launched at Dunfermline Comic Con on March 5. With Philp now studying at university, Maxwell has produced the artwork as well as the script himself.

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