Butteries ‘could get protected food status’

The buttery, or rowie, is a popular breakfast item in the North East. Picture: Wiki Commons
The buttery, or rowie, is a popular breakfast item in the North East. Picture: Wiki Commons
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A Scottish delicacy once described by Sir Terry Wogan as tasting like “a mouthful of seaweed” could soon be granted legal protection from copycats.

The rowie – or buttery, as it is also known – is one of Aberdeenshire’s most famous exports.

Ex-pats from the Granite City are known to get relatives to send packets of the savoury treats all around the world. But not everyone is a fan – broadcasting legend Wogan sparked a row several years ago while visiting the city when he said the salty snack was “an acquired taste”. Days later, he said he could never return to the north-east to face the wrath of buttery fans.

However, the humble rowie may soon be given the same status as Arbroath Smokies and Stornoway black pudding under the EU’s Protected Food Names (PFN) scheme.

Scotland’s cabinet secretary for food Richard Lochhead yesterday gave his backing to PFN applications for the rowie and Hamlyns oats, which are produced near Banff.

He said: “Grampian is home to some really iconic Scottish products including the famous rowie and Hamlyn’s porridge.

“This is Scotland’s Year of Food and Drink, providing us with a fantastic opportunity to showcase our produce to a global audience. People want to know they are buying the real deal when purchasing local produce – and why not? It is among the best to be found anywhere in the world.”

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