A short guide to the majestic Devil’s Pulpit at Finnich Glen

Finnich Glen. Picture: geograph.co.uk
Finnich Glen. Picture: geograph.co.uk
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Just a thirty minute drive from Glasgow - a visit to the surreal and mystical Devil’s Pulpit at Finnich Glen is a must for anyone with an interest in Scottish history and heritage.

Today, people sometimes refer to Finnich Glen itself, a short, 70ft steep glen, as the Devil’s Pulpit, but the name was originally used to describe a circular green-topped rock inside.

As you enter the glen, the green-topped rock can be seen. Picture: geographic.co.uk

As you enter the glen, the green-topped rock can be seen. Picture: geographic.co.uk

According to local lore, the gorge was a secret meeting place for the ancient Druids.

The Devil’s Pulpit was also where Satan himself was said to have preached to the Monks below.

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As you enter the glen, the green-topped rock can be seen not far ahead in the bed of the burn, just where the burn turns out of sight.

The area featured in TV series Outlander. Picture: geographic.co.uk

The area featured in TV series Outlander. Picture: geographic.co.uk

Which films and television series have featured the Devil’s Pulpit?

Despite its picturesque and unique features, Finnich Glen has surprisingly been overlooked by many film and television companies choosing to shoot in Scotland.

It did feature prominently in series one of historical time-travelling drama Outlander, in the truth forcing spring scenes, where Dougal - played by Graham McTavish - used the “Truth-inducing Waters” to make sure he believed and trusted Claire Randall (played by Catriona Balfe).

This picture-perfect spot was also featured towards the end of Roman yarn The Eagle which starred Holywood actor Channing Tatum as a Roman soldier.

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Safety tips

Take care - especially if you are visiting with children.

The drops are vertical and the staircase down to the gorge slippy. It would be best to visit in daylight, to take a torch and walk with caution.

How do I get there?

About 30 minutes by car from Glasgow, Finnich Glen is found near the village of Killear, just south of Drymen on the A809.