Nostalgia: Majesty of the Canongate

0
Have your say

IT is Edinburgh’s most historic thoroughfare and leads to the Palace of Holyroodhouse and to the Scottish Parliament.

And plans to restore the Royal Mile back to its former glory are in full swing.

The pipes and drums of Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders march down the Canongate. Picture: TSPL

The pipes and drums of Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders march down the Canongate. Picture: TSPL

New evidence has emerged that the cobbles on the Canongate stretch of the Royal Mile were a different colour from the grey setts used for the rest of the famous street.

The Canongate could now see itself paved in orange bricks – or “reddish” granite cobbles – as historical experts try to recreate the way the street once looked.

The Canongate has been the setting for many important occasions and celebrations over the years, ranging from royal visits to political protests.

In May 1954, the Duke and Duchess of Hamilton visited the Canongate Kirk to open a new session-house.

Reverend Selby Wright escorted the couple into the church as choir boys bowed when they passed by.

Many a pipe band has made the journey from the top of the Royal Mile down to the Canongate over the years.

In 1962, the Canongate hosted the pipes and drums of Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders as they marched along to the palace grounds.

The parade was in aid of the visit by King Olav V of Norway, who visited Edinburgh during his state visit to Scotland in October of that year.

This state visit was made to Scotland in order to express gratitude for the Scottish people’s help during World War Two.

Crowds flocked to the Canongate Kirk in June 1952 during one of Queen Elizabeth II’s royal visits to the Capital.

She was accompanied at the church by the then-minister, Rev Selby Wright, while onlookers crowded the Canongate waiting to catch a glimpse.

Back to the top of the page