More Heritage

More Heritage

Ancient Gaelic step dance tradition being kept alive

A 26-year-old dancer from Skye is helping to bring the ancient Gaelic tradition of step dance into the 21st century.

Inverness, Highlands & Islands 2
The Lewis Chessmen are ranked number nine on the list of 25 items. Picture: Neil Hanna

5,000 years of Scottish history summed up in 25 objects

They are the objects deemed to have shaped Scotland’s history, ranging from a medieval football to Antarctic goggles and a dancing fiddle.

Heritage 2
History on your doorstep - explore the new Jacobite Trail

10 surprising facts about Bonnie Prince Charlie

Revered by some as a romantic hero who tried to save the very soul of Scotland, reviled by others as ‘The Young Pretender’ who heedlessly led as many as two thousand to their death in the Battle of Culloden in an act of arrogance. Beautiful and cultured in youth, dissipated and gouty in his dotage: it’s not hard to see why Bonnie Prince Charlie looms large in the Scottish imagination to this day.

Promoted content
Black Watch at the Edinburgh University Drill Hall. Picture: Callum Bennetts

Scotsman 200: From theatre fires to stage favourites

To mark the 200th anniversary of The Scotsman, we are dipping into our archives to bring you a selection of some of the biggest stories of the last two centuries. This month we have recalled Scotland’s arts scene, reproducing The Scotsman’s original coverage of many of the most memorable events from the stage and screen to exhibitions, concerts and Edinburgh’s festivals. Today we’re looking back at some of the most famous plays to grace Scotland’s stages, as well as at the high jinks reported at the 1963 International Drama Conference and the tragedies that struck theatres when costumes and construction materials were flimsy and flammable.

Theatre
Music and beer lovers enjoy the first ever 'T in the Park' festival, at Strathclyde Country Park, Glasgow, August 1994.

Picture: The Library for Edinburgh Eye.

Scotsman 200: A nation of music lovers

To mark the 200th anniversary of The Scotsman, we are dipping into our archives to bring you a selection of some of the biggest stories of the last two centuries. This month we have recalled Scotland’s arts scene, reproducing The Scotsman’s original coverage of many of the most memorable events from the stage and screen to exhibitions, concerts and Edinburgh’s festivals. Today pop and jazz music takes centre stage as we look back at some of the highlights from the Beatles in Edinburgh and Glasgow to the first T in the Park festival in 1994.

Music
A gold ring given to Vivien Leigh. Picture: Getty

Family of Vivien Leigh to auction 250 items belonging to star

Gone With The Wind star Vivien Leigh’s family are selling 250 treasures once belonging to the actress from Hollywood’s Golden Age.

News
A scene from Trainspotting. Picture: PA Photo/Polygram/Liam Longman.

Scotsman 200: Inspiration and talent caught on film

To mark the 200th anniversary of The Scotsman, we are dipping into our archives to bring you a selection of some of the biggest stories of the last two centuries. This month we have recalled Scotland’s arts scene, reproducing The Scotsman’s original coverage of many of the most memorable events from the stage and screen to exhibitions, concerts and Edinburgh’s festivals. Today we look at some of the most memorable films with links to Scotland. When Whisky Galore – the original – was shot on Barra in 1948, Scotland did not have the reputation is does today as a sought-after filming destination. Scotland’s film industry has evolved dramatically since then and the 1990s bore a couple of the more notable blockbusters. Historical inaccuracies aside, Mel Gibson’s Braveheart was a hit in 1995 and in 1996 Trainspotting brought Edinburgh author Irvine Welsh’s bestseller to life.

Film
Bruno Walter and Kathleen Ferrier performed at the opening of the International Festival in the Usher Hall.

Scotsman 200: Capital flourishes as city of festivals

To mark the 200th anniversary of The Scotsman, we are dipping into our archives to bring you a selection of some of the biggest stories of the last two centuries. This month we have recalled Scotland’s arts scene, reproducing The Scotsman’s original coverage of many of the most memorable events from the stage and screen to exhibitions, concerts and Edinburgh’s festivals. Today’s topic is Edinburgh’s festivals. The first Edinburgh International Festival of Music, Art and Drama in August and September 1947 was the result of two years of planning by a committee that was formed in 1945 with the aim of creating a new post-war identity for the capital as “the cultural resort of Europe”. The inaugural Edinburgh International Film Festival was held the same year and has become the world’s longest continually running film festival. Since its inception in 1983, the Edinburgh International Book Festival has filled Charlotte Square Gardens with a tented village of venues. The festival “family” has grown considerably over the years to include more events than there is space to do justice.

Edinburgh festivals
Musical highlights include pipe bands playing at Murrayfield.

Scotsman 200: Concerts that captured the hearts of audiences

To mark the 200th anniversary of The Scotsman, we are dipping into our archives to bring you a selection of some of the biggest stories of the last two centuries. This month we have recalled Scotland’s arts scene, reproducing The Scotsman’s original coverage of many of the most memorable events from the stage and screen to exhibitions, concerts and Edinburgh’s festivals. Today the focus is on classical and folk music. Scotland’s rich landscapes and history have provided a great deal of inspiration for composers of classical and folk music. Its venues have also welcomed world-famous performers – pianists, orchestras, stars of the opera.

Music
Edinburgh author Ian Rankin

Scotsman 200: Literary characters captivate the world

To mark the 200th anniversary of The Scotsman, we are dipping into our archives to bring you a selection of some of the biggest stories of the last two centuries. This month we have recalled Scotland’s arts scene, reproducing The Scotsman’s original coverage of many of the most memorable events from the stage and screen to exhibitions, concerts and Edinburgh’s festivals. Today we look at some of the most famous novels from Scottish authors including Sir Walter Scott, Muriel Spark, JK Rowling and Ian Rankin. Scottish writing holds a distinguished position in the world of literature. Our poets, novelists, storytellers and biographers are read around the world. When Edinburgh became the first Unesco City of Literature in 2004, it came as little surprise. Auld Reekie has inspired over 500 novels including Ian Rankin’s Rebus books and Murial Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, abridged reviews of which are published here.

Books
Scotsman 200: Space for art to flourish

Scotsman 200: Space for art to flourish

To mark the 200th anniversary of The Scotsman, we are dipping into our archives to bring you a selection of some of the biggest stories of the last two centuries. This month we have recalled Scotland’s arts scene, reproducing The Scotsman’s original coverage of many of the most memorable events from the stage and screen to exhibitions, concerts and Edinburgh’s festivals. Today we shine the spotlight on visual art. When the Scottish National Portrait Gallery opened on Queen Street, Edinburgh, in 1898, it was partly thanks to this newspaper that such an impressive collection of art could be admired by interested members of the public. John Ritchie Findlay was both proprietor of The Scotsman and founder of the gallery. Various artistic movements have emerged in Scotland over the years – from the portraits of Allan Ramsay to the Glasgow Boys, the Scottish Colourists and the post-war “Scottish realism” of John Bellany and Sandy Moffat. More recently, Martin Boyce represented Scotland at the Venice Biennale in 2009, with an exhibition of his striking sculptures.

Lifestyle
A new exhibition at the Writers' Museum in Edinburgh celebrates 30 years of Ian Rankin's Inspector Rebus novels.

Ian Rankin says he knows he may be "outlived" by Inspector Rebus

IAN Rankin says he is prepared for Inspector Rebus to “outlive” him - as he launches the first ever festival inspired by the grizzled detective.
Lifestyle
South Uist flag

South Uist flag wins official recognition

SOUTH Uist is to have the first officially recognised community flag in the Outer Hebrides.

Inverness, Highlands & Islands 9
A 'glampotel' is available at Dundas Castle during festival season. Picture: Supplied

Edinburgh Festival Fringe: Dundas Castle offering glamping accomodation

EDINBURGH will soon be welcoming thousands for its festival season, but many visitors find it difficult to find available - and inexpensive - accommodation in the city.

Edinburgh, Fife & Lothians 1
Jean Cameron, Project Director of Paisleys UK City of Culture 2021 bid. Picture: John Devlin

Culture clash: Perth v Paisley in title fight

In Dunn Square in Paisley, the statues of industrial giants Thomas and Peter Coats gaze proprietorially over the skyline their success helped create. The brothers, former owners of J & P Coats thread mills, face away from each other. Thomas has a top hat in his left hand and his right tucked into his waistcoat. Peter sports sideburns Paul Weller would kill for. Each has an imperious expression on his face and a seagull perched on his droppings-encrusted head.

Heritage
North Gaulton Castle Seastack. Picture: VisitScotland

5 hidden tourist gems on Orkney

THERE are a host of well-known tourist attractions when you visit Orkney, but what about the lesser-known tourism gems?

Inverness, Highlands & Islands
Exterior of Saughton prison in Edinburgh. Picture: TSPL

George Robertson: The last man hanged in Edinburgh

He was the last man to be hanged in Edinburgh – and it would be hard to think of a crime more horrific to earn such a dubious ‘honour’.

Heritage 11
Heathrow Airport sponsors KnitFest 2017.

Heathrow Airport revealed as sponsor for Highland knit festival

THE UK’s biggest airport has been announced as headline sponsor of crafts festival Loch Ness Knit Fest 2017.

Inverness, Highlands & Islands
The 'Lady in a Fur Wrap' has been in Glasgow's museums collection for more than half a century.

Can the riddle of the Lady in a Fur Wrap finally be solved?

Scientific tests have been launched to try to crack a long-standing riddle over the true identity of the artist behind one of Glasgow's most celebrated paintings - and their enigmatic subject.

Heritage
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