Pessimism is the order of the day in Scotland

People in Scotland are more pessimistic than those elsewhere in the UK about both the economy and their own finances, according to a poll. Picture: TSPL

People in Scotland are more pessimistic than those elsewhere in the UK about both the economy and their own finances, according to a poll. Picture: TSPL

Share this article
1
Have your say

MORE than four in ten Scots fear they will be worse off as a result of the Autumn Statement, a survey has found.

People in Scotland are more pessimistic than those elsewhere in the UK about both the economy and their own finances, according to the poll by uSwitch.com. It also revealed that people aged 35 to 55 are most likely to feel they will lose out under the measures announced by the Chancellor.

The acceleration in the state pension age increase received the most negative response, while almost three-quarters of people believe the government fails to understand the financial difficulties facing ordinary people. Almost seven in ten don’t trust the government to make the best decisions for their financial future.

The survey found that just 9 per cent of people north of the Border think they will benefit from the Autumn Statement, with 44 per cent of Scots expecting to be worse off (compared with 41 per cent UK-wide). Another 41 per cent said nothing would change and 6 per cent weren’t sure.

“Despite containing some good news, the Autumn Statement has left most consumers deflated,” said Michael Ossei, personal finance expert at uSwitch. “The focus on the economy might be good for the financial health of the nation, but it has left individuals still feeling under the weather. The recovery is yet to reach their finances.”

Back to the top of the page