Photographer shares amazing pictures of Queensferry Crossing

A view looking across North Queensferry and the three Forth bridges. The Queensferry Crossing is due to open later this year. Picture: Finlay Wells
A view looking across North Queensferry and the three Forth bridges. The Queensferry Crossing is due to open later this year. Picture: Finlay Wells
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When it was announced a new Forth bridge would be built, thousands of Fife commuters breathed a sigh of relief.

The construction of the Queensferry Crossing has also been a boon for amateur photographers, eager to follow the progress of Scotland’s largest infrastructure project in a generation.

Work began on the Queensferry Crossing in 2011. Picture: Finlay Wells

Work began on the Queensferry Crossing in 2011. Picture: Finlay Wells

Thanks to the age of digital cameras, smartphones and drone technology, the new bridge has been documented in exhausting detail by dozens of social media accounts and snappers from across the country.

But even in such a crowded market, the work of one budding photographer has stood out.

Finlay Wells only took up taking pictures a few months ago, but his images of the Forth bridges have already been shared thousands of times online.

The 36-year-old from Kelty had bought a quadcopter with a view to using for filming, but quickly found it was equally as good for capturing still images.

The Forth Bridge, opened in 1890, is the oldest of the three crossings. Picture: Finlay Wells

The Forth Bridge, opened in 1890, is the oldest of the three crossings. Picture: Finlay Wells

READ MORE: The final years of the Queensferry Passage

He didn’t have to look far to find a suitable subject for his pictures.

Work on the Queensferry Crossing began in 2011 and the cable-stayed bridge is scheduled to open to traffic later this year.

Compared to its neighbours, the Forth Bridge, opened in 1890, and the Forth Road Bridge, opened in 1964, the new crossing has been filmed and documented by an unprecedented number of photographers.

Wells used a quadcopter to capture his spectacular shots.

Wells used a quadcopter to capture his spectacular shots.

For Finlay, getting the best results is all down to gradually building up your skills.

“It is all about learning in stages,” he said. “Firstly learning how to fly and control the quadcopter, and secondly learning how to control the cameras settings manually including ISO, shutter speed, aperture and focus.

“Third would be learning how to edit in a program such as Adobe Lightroom, which helps to bring out the colours and shadows in your pictures.

“A quadcopter was the perfect tool to get some up to date images of the bridge.”

Examples of Finlay’s work can be found on his Facebook page

READ MORE: Queensferry Crossing opening delayed until between mid-July and end of August