Mapping a new vision for Glasgow’s famous Broomielaw

The Clyde Arc, known locally as the squinty bridge, links the Broomielaw with Tradeston. Picture: Robert Perry

The Clyde Arc, known locally as the squinty bridge, links the Broomielaw with Tradeston. Picture: Robert Perry

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It was once synonymous with seafaring, a bustling quay lined with ships and warehouses.

But today the Broomielaw is little more than a back road to Glasgow city centre. While impressive new offices have replaced the shipping merchants, few visit after dark.

The Broomielaw at Glasgow city centre in 1865. Picture: Thomas Annan/Wikicommons

The Broomielaw at Glasgow city centre in 1865. Picture: Thomas Annan/Wikicommons

Following the opening of the Glasgow Arc, known locally as the squinty bridge, in 2006, this stretch of Clyde is no longer accessible to anything but the smallest of boats.

The future lies instead in developing its impressive waterfront location.

Now Glasgow City Council is looking to bring forward a regeneration plan for the Broomielaw, as part of a wider scheme to invest in nine individual districts across the city.

A drop-in event - Your Broomielaw - which will take place at The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, between 11am - 9pm on Thursday, 24 November, and will offer everyone with an interest or stake in the area the opportunity to help shape its future.

A number of office developments have been built along the Broomielaw since the turn of the century. Picture: Donald Macleod/TSPL

A number of office developments have been built along the Broomielaw since the turn of the century. Picture: Donald Macleod/TSPL

The event will allow anyone taking part to review the ideas from the initial event in October, and help refine proposals from that with a view to informing the prioritised action plan for the Broomielaw district regeneration framework.

The local authority says the Broomielaw district has “attracted enormous investment over the past 15 years”, and points to the successful opening of the Clyde Arc as well as the numerous office complexes that have opened in the area.

It says future developments along the waterfront are “highly likely” in the short and medium-term future.

Councillor Frank McAveety, council leader said: “The Broomielaw district is a key area for the city centre and indeed the whole of Glasgow, home to some of the biggest companies we have, in a fantastic location beside the River Clyde and the emerging quarter at the SECC and the SSE Hydro.

“While much has been achieved here since the start of the 21st century, there is a lot to be done to fulfil the district’s potential.”

READ MORE: Crossing the Clyde: Next generation of bridges planned

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