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Retailers enjoy Commonwealth feelgood factor

Specsavers designer tartan glasses, as worn by former Miss Scotland Nicola Mimnagh, have benefited from the Glasgow Games. Picture: Contributed

Specsavers designer tartan glasses, as worn by former Miss Scotland Nicola Mimnagh, have benefited from the Glasgow Games. Picture: Contributed

  • by PERRY GOURLEY
 

FOOTFALL figures soared across Scotland during the Commonwealth Games as retailers received a significant boost from the event, figures out today showed.

According to data compiled by retail intelligence firm Springboard, footfall in Glasgow’s shopping areas rose by 21.9 per cent over the two-week period of the Games compared to the same period last year. Footfall across Scotland also grew by 13.8 per cent during the fortnight.

The figures came as Specsavers became one of the first retailers to report a sales boost from the Games. It said it had seen strong demand for designer tartan frames worn by the likes of Scottish model and former Miss Scotland Nicola Mimnagh.

Tunnock’s has also reported that sales of its tea-cakes soared by 62 per cent in the 24 hours after they were featured in the event’s opening ceremony.

Diane Wehrle, marketing and insights director at Springboard said: “Historically, major sporting events have had a positive impact on footfall and the Commonwealth Games has been no exception.

“Whilst footfall across high streets has been unpredictable this year, the Games has triggered a strong uplift which we anticipate is set to continue in the coming weeks into the August bank holiday weekend.”

Bailie Liz Cameron, executive member for jobs and the economy at Glasgow City Council, said: “We are thrilled that not only has out great city been showcased to the globe, but that our high streets have benefited from an influx of visitors.

“We are hopeful footfall will remain strong over the coming weeks as the ‘legacy effect’ of the Games kicks in and look forward to a strong August bank holiday weekend.”

Meanwhile, figures out yesterday showed shoppers saw the deepest level of deflation for eight years last month as retailers continue to discount groceries, clothes and electrical goods.

Prices fell for the 15th month in a row to hit 1.9 per cent in July from 1.8 per cent a month earlier, according to the British Retail Consortium/Nielsen shop price index. The survey’s authors said this was the deepest level of deflation since they began collecting the data in December 2006 with a record low for food inflation.

British Retail Consortium director general Helen Dickinson said: “This is great news for households who are benefiting from fierce competition within the industry at a time when disposable incomes remain under pressure.”

 

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