Royal Burgess Golfing Society unveils £750,000 revamp

Bank of Scotland relationship manager Derek Weir, left, toasts the revamp with Royal Burgess treasurer Jim Rigby. Picture: Chris Watt
Bank of Scotland relationship manager Derek Weir, left, toasts the revamp with Royal Burgess treasurer Jim Rigby. Picture: Chris Watt
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An Edinburgh golfing society that holds claim to be the oldest in the world has completed a £750,000 refurbishment of its facilities with support from Bank of Scotland.

Royal Burgess Golfing Society, in Barnton, said the project had significantly upgraded the listed club house building that dates back to 1896. This includes changes to the entrance, dining and function room, members’ bar and locker area.

In addition, a professional shop has been “sympathetically” added to the building. The project has been undertaken to meet increased demand identified by the society, which has some 1,000 members, as well as enabling it to host functions and corporate events.

The society, which dates back to 1735, was supported by a £580,000 funding package from Bank of Scotland.

Jim Rigby, treasurer at the Royal Burgess Golfing Society said: “We have an exceptional course at Royal Burgess and, as the oldest golfing society in the world, a reputation to match. However, our clubhouse amenities were beginning to look a bit tired, but after the refurbishment we now have facilities that match the course and will further enhance our reputation.

“In addition to the refurbishment we have improved our food and beverage offering which will help drive additional income through attracting more functions and corporate events. Bank of Scotland has been a longstanding supporter of the society and provided funding for a similar project 15 years ago.”

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Derek Weir, relationship manager at Bank of Scotland, added: “The Royal Burgess Golfing Society has banked with the Bank of Scotland for over 60 years.

“Established in 1735 and with honorary members including Jack Nicklaus alongside members of the royal family, the society is steeped in prestige.

“Alongside maximising the opportunity that functions and corporate events offer, the facilities will also help drive membership at a time when most golf clubs are seeing membership numbers decline.”