Floating pier helps growing Argyll timber economy set sail

The new pier will allow more timber to be transported via boat instead of lorry. Picture: Contributed

The new pier will allow more timber to be transported via boat instead of lorry. Picture: Contributed

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A new floating pier is to be built on the shores of Ardcastle Forest in Argyll which could unlock an estimated £10 million of the region’s growing timber supplies.

With harvesting on the increase and the nearby Ardrishaig Pier already extremely busy, the new pier on the National Forest Estate will boost the ability for shipping greater quantities of timber to wood processors.

The £123,000 grant from the Scottish Government’s strategic timber transport scheme will allow an estimated 250,000 tonnes of timber to be shipped from the area over the next 10 years.

The additional shipping facilities will be able to take larger boats in deeper water and cut down the need for using timber wagons on fragile rural roads, saving 3.5 million lorry miles.

Rural economy secretary Fergus Ewing said: “This development is excellent news for the economic growth of Scotland’s economy.

“By increasing the capacity of timber transport facilities in Argyll, we are providing the sector with a further opportunity to build on our £1 billion forest industry success story.

“I met the Timber Transport Forum last month and highlighted the importance of good transport solutions to help maximise business growth. I am very keen to keep driving this forward, stimulating opportunities to improve Scotland’s rural economy.”

The funding is being awarded to John Scott Floating Piers Ltd who will be taking forward the delivery of the pier. Through his company, Mr Scott will be making the pier’s facilities open to all users who wish to transport timber.

The pier and shore-side infrastructure is planned to be around 3,500 m2 in size.

ohn Scott, of JST Services said: “I am delighted to receive this grant which will help improve the flow of timber from the forests of Argyll to processors.”

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